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Save Our Schools Arizona
Weekly Education Report

56th Legislature, 2nd General Session
Volume 6, Issue 5• Week of February 5, 2024

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Horne Peddles Misinformation & Pushes Indoctrination

Superintendent Horne was busy this week — and as usual, that meant drama and headlines, and nothing good for Arizona kids or public schools. 

Voucher Misinformation Gone Wild: On Monday, Horne and Republican lawmakers held a press conference, once again pushing the already-discredited false narrative that ESA vouchers save the state money. Horne and Senate President Petersen repeatedly peddled misinformation around a “K-12 surplus,” ignoring the fact that the ADE must request at least an additional $164 million in order to fund Arizona’s ballooning over-budget ESA voucher program. When pushed by reporters for an explanation of cost savings, they twisted themselves in knots attempting to deny that vouchers are contributing to the state’s massive $835 million budget shortfall, despite reports from actual economists at the Joint Legislative Budget Committee (JLBC)  to the contrary. 

As ABC-15’s Melissa Blasius reported, “Elementary math is all you need to understand that the ESA universal voucher program is costing more.” Snowballing costs are set to drain $1 billion in desperately needed funds from public schools in 2024. SOSAZ volunteers were there to hold Horne and Petersen accountable, flanking them with signs urging them to “Tell the Truth” and pointing out that “Vouchers for the Rich are Robbing Our Schools & Our State.”

This press conference and tough questioning from the media show that public pressure is mounting to rein in the state’s out-of-control voucher program — and Horne and Republican lawmakers are on the defense. Keep it up!!!! Email your lawmakers HERE!

Horne Pushes PragerU Indoctrination: On Tuesday, Supt. Horne hosted yet another press conference to announce a new partnership with PragerU — a dangerous indoctrination scheme created by a far-right talk show host. After bashing Arizona’s public school teachers and accusing them of teaching leftist ideology, Horne and Senator Jake Hoffman proudly pushed teachers to use PragerU content (which will now be directly linked on the ADE website) in their classrooms. 

What’s the issue? First, Prager recently spoke at a Moms for Liberty conference and boasted that “we bring doctrines to children… what is the bad of our indoctrination?” In a PragerU promo video, he said: “We are in the mind-changing business.” 

The content is designed to spread dangerous misinformation to youth in quick videos that dismiss the horrors of slavery and teach inaccurate and untruthful versions of history and science. In one video, an animated Christopher Columbus says: “Being taken as a slave is better than being killed, no?” 

Prager “U” is not a university, nor is it an accredited education organization. It’s funded by billionaires like Betsy DeVos and the Texas Wilks family, which bankroll far-right schemes like private school vouchers. As Naomi Oreskes, Harvard professor of the history of science said, “By their own self-description, they are an advocacy group promoting conservative viewpoints on various political, economic and sociological topics. It is completely inappropriate for any state to grant them any influence, much less authority. over educational matters. For an American state government to authorize misleading, false and overtly biased materials for use in classrooms really crosses the Rubicon. It’s a new and alarming low.”

Want to speak up? Supt. Horne’s Hotline to report “inappropriate lessons that detract from teaching academic standards” is still open. We might as well put it to good use 😈

Call the hotline to leave a message at 602-771-3500 or submit a form entry here. Tell them you have concerns about PragerU content being inappropriate, and let them know you think Arizona schools should teach truthful and accurate history and keep politics out of classrooms.

Actions You Can Take

🛑 Use Request to Speak on the following bills:

👎 NO on SB1131 👎 NO on SB1182

👎 NO on SB1187 👎 NO on SB1286

👎 NO on SB1287 👎 NO on SB1369

👎 NO on SB1370 👍 YES on SB1455

👎 NO on SB1461 👍 YES on SB1465

👎 NO on SB1495 👎 NO on SB1556

👎 NO on SB1583 👎 NO on SCR1013

👎 NO on SCR1015 👎 NO on SCR1020

👎 NO on SCR1027 👎 NO on SCR1034

👎 NO on HB2095 👎 NO on HB2483

👎 NO on HB2588  👎 NO on HB2629

👎 NO on HB2719 👎 NO on HCR2040

💻 Email your lawmakers TODAY to let them know that you support Governor Hobbs’ plan to reform out-of-control ESA vouchers! If you’ve done it already, please do it again. Our easy-to-use email tool makes it turnkey to make your voice heard: bit.ly/VoucherReform

💻 Email your member of Congress to tell them NO to federal vouchers by using this easy tool from our friends at the Network for Public Education: actionnetwork.org/letters/tell-congress-no-federal-vouchers-not-now-not-ever

Need a RTS account? Sign up here. Want a refresher? Our friends at Civic Engagement Beyond Voting are hosting RTS trainings on Mondays at 6:30 PM beginning January 8. Sign up here!

Upcoming Events

*NEW* Check out SOSAZ’s updated Upcoming Events page to find all of our online and in-person events near you!

Everyone is invited to Parents Day at the Capitol — parents, grandparents, students, educators, community members, and more! Hear from public school advocates, meet with lawmakers, and learn how you can advocate for public schools. Lunch will be provided so be sure to register!

Parents Day at the Capitol

Monday, February 5 at 11:00 am-3:00 pm – Phoenix – Register HERE

Prop 123 Explained

This week, Republicans and Democrats released competing proposals to renew Prop 123, which currently injects $330 million into Arizona’s classrooms from the state land trust each year. While it is good to see bipartisan agreement that Prop 123 must be renewed to avoid massive cuts to public education, the devil is in the details — and current political polarization makes compromise incredibly hard

Gov. Hobbs held a press conference to break down her plan, and both parties filed bills. Democrats introduced mirror bills in the Senate and House: SCR1029 (Marsh, D-4) and HCR2044 (Schwiebert, D-2). Republicans broke the measure into two bills, meaning both would need to go to the 2024 ballot: SCR1027 (Mesnard, R-13) and SCR1034 (Hoffman, R-15); mirrors in the House are HCR2047 (Gress, R-4) and HCR2048 (Smith, R-29).

Both proposals require a simple legislative majority vote to pass. Both groups of bills are veto-proof and would go straight to the voters on the November 2024 ballot. Here’s where they differ:

Republican Proposal

  • Renews Prop 123 funds at the current 6.9% rate ($330 million per year)

  • Funds $330 million for pay raises for classroom teachers

  • Shifts funds from current general school funding, requiring the legislature to backfill hundreds of millions for classrooms

  • 2 measures would go to the ballot, potentially confusing voters

Democrat Proposal

  • Increases Prop 123 funds to 8.9% ($759 million per year)

  • Funds $347 million for pay raises for classroom teachers 

  • Funds $118 million for school staff, including bus drivers, aides, counselors, and more

  • Funds $37 million for school facilities and safety improvements

  • Continues $257 million for general school funding

  • 1 measure would go to the ballot

The case for more funding: In Arizona, it’s easy to make the case for increased K-12 funding, as our classrooms remain funded at 49th in the nation and all educators (teachers and staff) bear the brunt. Rep. Judy Schwiebert (D-2) said adding support into the plan is justified, comparing raising only teacher salaries to only putting a new engine in a car. “Like the cars we all depend on, our schools require many essential parts. Unless you also invest in some tires, in this case in the form of increased pay for essential classroom aides, reading and math specialists, counselors and all support staff, you’re not going anywhere.”

What the economists say: The governor’s office released its own numbers, prepared by economists from ASU’s WP Carey School of Business and investment bank Stifel. Hobbs says this analysis proves her plan won’t put the state land trust’s health at risk. That analysis projects the land trust portfolio’s investments would continue performing at the annual return of 7.24% it has demonstrated over the past 10 years. In that scenario, while increasing schools’ distribution to 8.9%, the fund’s balance would grow from interest and annual deposits from $7.9 billion in 2025 to $8.9 billion in 2035.

As Sen. Christine Marsh said, “Our choice is between letting that number sit in a bank account and get bigger or setting Arizona’s children up for success and supporting our entire education system and all of its professionals.” 

The path forward is fraught and will require significant public pressure to bring opponents to the Governor’s plan to the table. Republican lawmakers do not need Hobbs’ support to get it on the ballot; if their entire caucus votes for the measure, it will be on the ballot. The question is: will they negotiate with Gov. Hobbs to find a compromise — and at what cost? 

If nothing goes to the ballot this year, Prop 123 will expire in June 2025. Schools will no longer receive the $330 million a year; those funds would sit in the state land trust unused. This loss would be paired with the loss of federal Covid relief dollars next school year, as well as the nearly $1 billion that’s being siphoned to ESA vouchers. Arizona schools are already in crisis; our kids are counting on our leaders to strike a deal that works for educators and students. 

As the Legislature Turns

Lawmakers Prepping a Long Ballot: The sheer number of ballot referrals moving through committees this week is eye-popping — more than all the referrals the legislature advanced to the ballot in 2021 and 2022 combined. Because these would go directly to voters, Gov. Hobbs cannot veto them. 

SOSAZ is tracking the below bills and urges you to weigh in with RTS, emails and phone calls. More information is available in the “Bills in Committee” section below.

Veto-Proof Legislative Referrals:

These measures require a simple majority vote from the Republican-controlled legislature and would go straight to the 2024 ballot, evading Gov. Hobbs’ veto pen. 

  • SCR1013, Kavanagh (R-3), would ask voters to ban trans kids from using the school bathrooms, changing facilities and “sleeping quarters” that align with their gender identities. Gov. Hobbs vetoed a similar bill last year. 
  • SCR1020, Mesnard (R-13), would ask voters to amend the state Constitution to automatically extend the previous year’s state budget if lawmakers don’t pass one in time, removing the only real motivation for lawmakers to work together and avoid shutting down our state. 
  • SCR1027, Mesnard (R-13), would ask voters to put a new version of Prop 123 in the state Constitution that restricts funds to “eligible teachers” only, rather than the many and varied needs of public schools. In a political move, the measure strips $330 million in Prop 123 funds from general education, removing local control over those dollars. 
  • SCR1034, Hoffman (R-15), would ask voters to set the actual salary schedule for Prop 123, directing funds to classroom teachers only and expecting the deficit-riddled general fund to somehow backfill the rest.
  • SCR1015, Kern (R-27), and HCR2040, Smith (R-29), would ask voters to ban Arizona and its schools from spending public funds to promote a laundry list of culture-war conspiracy theories which would surely be twisted and weaponized against our public schools. 

Legislative Revolving Door: House lawmakers continue to leave their posts at unprecedented speed. Leezah Sun (D-22) resigned on Wednesday, effective immediately, after the House Ethics Committee released a damning report and lawmakers drafted a resolution for her expulsion. Just moments later that same day, Amish Shah (D-5) announced his resignation effective Thursday, February 1, to focus on his crowded Congressional primary. His seatmate Jennifer Longdon (D-5) resigned earlier this session. This leaves voters in LD5 without any representation in the House. Democrats from LD5 will meet on Monday and hold two separate votes to nominate three candidates each to replace Longdon and Shah, after which the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors will select the appointee. 

The Maricopa County Board of Supervisors appointed Jevin Hodge for the seat formerly held by Athena Salman (D-8). Hodge was sworn in on Friday.

Bills in Committee

SB1131, sponsored by John Kavanagh (R-3), would force a “do-over election” for any non-statewide or federal election with less than 25% turnout, declaring the results void and requiring the election to be repeated when a  statewide or federal office is also on the ballot. Many school bond and override elections suffer low turnout, but forcing an election mulligan is not the solution. It disenfranchises the voters who bothered to show up and may present constitutional issues. Scheduled for Senate Elections Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1182, sponsored by John Kavanagh (R-3), is a shower-only version of last year’s “bathroom bill” that would ban trans kids from using the showers at school that align with their gender identities. Anyone who “encounters” a trans person in a shower area could file suit against public schools. A federal court found that these policies violate the US Constitution and Title IX, so in addition to being monstrously cruel and creating harm from continued anti-trans rhetoric, this would open Arizona to a host of lawsuits at taxpayer expense. Polls show that Americans from every political ideology and age group oppose anti-trans legislation. Gov. Hobbs vetoed last year’s bill. Scheduled for Senate Education Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE.

SB1187, sponsored by John Kavanagh (R-3), would require public schools in a district that has a bond or override election on the ballot to be polling places “only if other nearby appropriate government buildings are unavailable,” creating potential issues relating to child safety and available space — and voiding current exemptions. No external entity knows better for local schools than their own staff; state lawmakers should not be mandating this decision for them. Scheduled for Senate Elections Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1286, sponsored by Jake Hoffman, would require all district schools to close on primary and general election days, and district schools (but not charter or ESA voucher-funded schools) to offer their gymnasiums as polling places. Teachers would be required to attend inservice training and banned from taking a vacation day, presumably to keep them from working the polls. Arizona and the nation are already struggling to find enough election workers; it makes no sense to legislate a ban on teachers doing their patriotic duty — to say nothing of the disruption this would cause to families. Similar to a bill from last year that Gov. Hobbs vetoed. Scheduled for Senate Elections Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1287, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would ban district and charter schools from exposing minors to so-called “sexually explicit materials.” The incredibly broad description includes text, audio and video that references sexual contact, sexual excitement, and even physical contact with a person’s clothed or unclothed buttocks. This would ban many classic works of literature, from Shakespeare to Maya Angelou. Violations would be a class 5 felony, punishable by up to 2 years in jail. Arizona law already covers this subject. Gov. Hobbs vetoed the same bill last year. Scheduled for Senate Government Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE.

SB1369, sponsored by Shawnna Bolick (R-2), would require each school district and individual public school to post on its website information on students’ race, color, national origin, sex, disability, and age that is meant for the US Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights. Schools would also have to complete a newly created survey from the Arizona Department of Education on bullying, fighting, harassment and other school safety issues, which ADE would post on their website. Public schools are already subject to many laws covering discrimination and bullying, making this an excessive overreach. Meanwhile, bills that would expand these protections to kids at ESA voucher-funded schools are going unheard. Use your comments to mention that! Scheduled for Senate Education Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE.

SB1370, sponsored by Shawnna Bolick (R-2), would ban cities from requiring businesses run by youth under 18 to be licensed or pay sales taxes if they make under $10,000 per year. While no one wants to stifle entrepreneurship for young people, this bill removes requirements for licensure, potentially opening the door to exposing kids to predatory practices or exploiting kids. Scheduled for Senate Government Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE.

SB1455, sponsored by Ken Bennett (R-1), extends the deadline for the public school tax credit to be used for broader purposes, including capital items, school meal programs, consumable health care supplies, playground equipment and shade structures. The current deadline is June 30, 2024. Having the flexibility to determine what needs attention most will benefit our local schools. Scheduled for Senate Finance & Commerce Committee, Monday. SUPPORT.

SB1461, sponsored by Ken Bennett (R-1), would restructure the state charter board by removing the governor’s responsibility to appoint four of its members and dividing that responsibility between the Speaker of the House and Senate President instead. Scheduled for Senate Education Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE.

SB1465, sponsored by Ken Bennett (R-1), would make the required literacy endorsement for certificated K-5 teachers (passed in 2021) voluntary. Teachers must do all of this on their own time and with their own money, meaning these onerous requirements are encouraging many educators to leave the classroom. Making it voluntary would level the playing field a bit between highly regulated certificated teachers and other, less regulated types of educators. Scheduled for Senate Education Committee, Wednesday. SUPPORT.

SB1495, sponsored by JD Mesnard (R-13), would more than double certain business property tax exemptions, from $207,366 to $500,000 for each taxpayer. With a projected two-year deficit of more than $1.7 billion, now is not the time to give away even more state revenue via tax cuts! Scheduled for Senate Finance & Commerce Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1556, sponsored by Ken Bennett (R-1), is a tax cut for out-of-state remote sellers. Arizona has required out-of-state sellers to pay sales tax since 2019, following a 2018 US Supreme Court ruling (South Dakota v. Wayfair). Since then, far-right factions have been trying to undo or limit the law. This would hold long-term, negative and potentially disastrous impacts for the state general fund (which is already running a $1.7 billion two-year deficit) and would negatively impact public schools. Scheduled for Senate Finance & Commerce Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1583, sponsored by Justine Wadsack (R-17), would require each public school in Arizona to give parents an overview of the ESA voucher program, including award amount and approved expenses; a list of charter schools located a “reasonable distance” from the school; and several pages of information on “Arizona’s school choice options” for the parent to sign. The school would be required to keep a copy of the signed disclosure in the student’s file and to assist any parent who wants to switch schools after reading the pamphlet. Scheduled for Senate Education Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE.

SCR1013, sponsored by John Kavanagh (R-3), would ask voters to ban trans kids from using the school bathrooms, changing facilities and “sleeping quarters” that align with their gender identities. It would create a situation where trans kids couldn’t use any facilities at all without undue scrutiny of their bodies, calling that a “reasonable accommodation.” Anyone who “encounters” a trans person in a bathroom could file suit against public schools. A federal court found that these policies violate the US Constitution and Title IX, so in addition to being monstrously cruel and creating harm from continued anti-trans rhetoric, this would open Arizona to a host of lawsuits at taxpayer expense. Gov. Hobbs vetoed a similar bill last year; this referral would go directly to the voters, so she can’t veto it. Scheduled for Senate Education Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE.

SCR1015, sponsored by Anthony Kern (R-27), would ask voters to ban Arizona, its cities and counties, and its state universities and community colleges (but not voucher-funded schools or the ADE’s new PragerU partnership) from spending public funds to promote a laundry list of culture-war conspiracy theories. These include reducing meat or dairy consumption or production, eating insects, walking or biking more, taking public transit, reducing air travel, limiting the number of articles of clothing a person may buy or own, recycling water for drinking, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, limiting the increase of global temperature, producing or adopting a climate action plan, replacing private ownership, or implementing mass surveillance systems to monitor motor vehicle travel. As we’ve said before, the legislature should not be setting curriculum. See mirror bill HCR2040, sponsored by Austin Smith (R-29). Scheduled for Senate Government Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE.

SCR1020, sponsored by J.D. Mesnard (R-13), would ask voters to amend the state Constitution to automatically extend the previous year’s state budget if lawmakers don’t pass one in time. This would remove the only real motivation for lawmakers to work together and avoid shutting down our state. Lawmakers’ only constitutional responsibility is to pass a budget by the start of the new fiscal year (no later than June 30). The same bill failed to pass last year. Scheduled for Senate Appropriations Committee, Tuesday. OPPOSE.

SCR1027, sponsored by JD Mesnard (R-13), would ask voters to put a new version of Prop 123 in the state Constitution that restricts funds to “eligible teachers” only, rather than the many and varied needs of public schools as the expiring version of Prop 123 allows. Individual schools are best suited to determine their own needs, and don’t need a top-down mandate. We encourage Republican lawmakers to work with the governor and their Democratic colleagues to craft a more flexible solution that has bipartisan support and will be roundly approved by voters. Please use your RTS comments to say the same. Scheduled for Senate Education Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE with comments.

SCR1034, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would ask voters to set the actual salary schedule for Prop 123. Normally the legislature does this internally in case anything needs changing, but sending it to voters makes it impossible to tweak later. It directs funds to classroom teachers only, expecting the strapped general fund (which is currently running a $1.7 billion two-year deficit) to somehow backfill the current $257 million for general school funding. It bars district and charter schools from reducing teacher salaries below the FY2024-25 amount, even if the prop fails to direct the necessary funds to schools. This inflexible proposal will force districts to cut programs, slash resources, close schools and lay off teachers. It restricts funds to only certain types of teachers, which Judy Schwiebert (D-2) said is like buying a new transmission for a car but not replacing its four flat tires. And it puts two measures on the ballot in an already crowded year, which would both need to pass to be functional. We encourage Republican lawmakers to work with the governor and their Democratic colleagues to craft a more flexible solution that has bipartisan support and will be roundly approved by voters. Please use your RTS comments to say the same. Scheduled for Senate Education Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE with comments.

HB2483, sponsored by Barbara Parker (R-10), would require public K-12 schools and universities (but not voucher-funded private schools) to disclose their admissions criteria and would regulate any supposed discrimination, preferential treatment and “traditional academic success factors.” Are lawmakers trying the classic “look over there!” technique because of all the bad press on ESA vouchers? Scheduled for House Municipal Oversight & Elections Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE.

HB2588, sponsored by Tim Dunn (R-25), would require notaries to get a valid fingerprint clearance card, provide their thumbprint with each notarization, and notify the secretary of state via certified mail if they change their email address. Many private citizens become notaries to assist with citizen initiatives; this unnecessary red tape would stifle citizen participation in democracy. Scheduled for House Government Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE.

HB2719, sponsored by Michael Carbone (R-25), would require school bond and override measures to have 60%+ approval from eligible voters — not just voters who turn out — in order to pass. In effect, this measure would stop school districts from ever passing desperately needed bonds or overrides again. The measure also applies to cities, counties and community college districts. Scheduled for House Municipal Oversight & Elections Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE.

HCR2040, sponsored by Austin Smith (R-29), would ask voters to ban Arizona, its cities and counties, and its state universities and community colleges (but not voucher-funded schools or the ADE’s new PragerU partnership) from spending public funds to promote a laundry list of culture-war conspiracy theories. These include reducing meat or dairy consumption or production, eating insects, walking or biking more, taking public transit, reducing air travel, limiting the number of articles of clothing a person may buy or own, recycling water for drinking, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, limiting the increase of global temperature, producing or adopting a climate action plan, replacing private ownership, or implementing mass surveillance systems to monitor motor vehicle travel. As we’ve said before, the legislature should not be setting curriculum. See mirror bill SCR1015, sponsored by Anthony Kern (R-27). Scheduled for House Municipal Oversight & Elections Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE.

Bills in Rules Committees

After being heard in Rules Committees, these bills will go through caucus meetings (which usually happen on Tuesdays) before being brought to a full vote. 

HB2095, sponsored by Barbara Parker (R-10), would expand the school tuition organization (STO) voucher program to students in foster care. STOs are dollar-for-dollar tax credits to private schools that result in significantly less money for public schools (which serve the vast majority of foster youth). Since the STO voucher program’s creation, Arizona has lost out on over $2.1 billion in funding. Meanwhile, our state’s public schools remain in the bottom 5 nationwide, even after recent investments. Gov. Hobbs vetoed this bill last year. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

HB2629, sponsored by Ben Toma (R-27), would require schools to include at least 45 minutes of instruction on “the history of communist regimes around the world and the prevalence of poverty, starvation, migration, systemic lethal violence and suppression of speech under communist regimes.” State lawmakers shouldn’t be establishing curriculum; setting curriculum should remain the purview of those trained in curriculum development who understand history and pedagogy. Furthermore, this is another unfunded mandate for public schools but not private, voucher-funded schools. Schools would be required to include this instruction on world history in all American Government courses required for high school graduation beginning in 2024-25. The bill specifies Mao, Stalin, Castro, Lenin, Pol Pot, and Maduro as topics. Scheduled for House Judiciary Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE.

Introducing the Save Our Schools Arizona Legislative Bill Tracker! This is your one-stop shop for following the K-12 legislation lawmakers will be debating in the 2024 legislative session.

Click here or on the image above to access the tracker. This is a live link that will continue to be updated as new information becomes available. Bookmark the link so you can access the tracker anytime! 

Public School Proud!

Check out some incredible pictures and stories from across the state that make us #PublicSchoolProud!

Know a story you think we should spotlight? Send an email to tyler@sosarizona.org to let us know!

Future engineers in action! At Fourth Ave Jr. High in Yuma, students in Mr. Carey’s STEM class are always treated to hands-on experiments that teach them to think creatively. This week, 6th grade students constructed catapults and launched ping pong balls to better understand variable changes.

Tucson Unified School District’s Fine Arts Department and Mariachi teachers from across the district presented the 2023-2024 Middle School & High School Honor Mariachi Concert. Students earned their spot in the talented ensemble through a rigorous audition process.

Mesa’s Westwood Academy added a new banner to their gym — “National Unified Champion School.” Westwood’s Unified sports program includes Special Olympic Athletes who participate in basketball, badminton, and track and field within Arizona’s Interscholastic sports program. The entire school celebrated the program’s success at a high energy pep rally!

We are excited to announce SOSAZ’s *NEW* Public Education Defense Fund, which will protect Arizona students’ right to a safe, quality, accessible public school in their community.

Every dollar contributed to this fund will go directly towards electing pro-public education candidates up and down the 2024 ballot, from school board to the state legislature. 

Donate to SOSAZ’s Public Education Defense Fund Today!

Building a strong Public Education Defense Fund is essential to fighting back against increasingly dangerous political agendas that threaten our students’ right to learn in safety, acquire a truthful understanding of science and history, and succeed in excellent public schools.

Your contributions will help us recruit, elect, and support public education champions running for local school boards and the Arizona state legislature, shifting the balance of power at the Arizona state legislature towards one that will prioritize, fund, and defend Arizona’s public school students, educators, and classrooms. 

Thank you for helping us work toward a future where a high-quality, fully-funded public education is available to all Arizona students.

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